FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
IMG_6016.jpg
       
     
IMG_6015.jpg
       
     
OUTSIND IN
       
     
SITE : Entry to the Fashion Building
       
     
SITE ANALYSIS : ATRIUM/GALLERY/INTERNAL STREET
       
     
SITE FOR ARTWORK
       
     
 The site, the main circulation spine of the fashion building at RMIT Brunswick, in the parlance of architectural typology, can be classified as an internal street. A recently completed example of this is the new Academic Street at RMIT City campus, an ancient example is the Grand Bazaar in Isfahan, Iran, dating from the 11th century. Walter Benjamin,s Arcade Project, much loved by European art theorists, eloquently translates this urban form into the lexicon of the modernist city. Today the ubiquitous shopping malls of the global village, deploy the internal street in prepackaged themes to suit a predetermined program much as movie sets are designed to frame the story. There are now internal ‘tuscan arcades’ as the main circulation spine on the new super cruise ships, complete with vaulted ‘skylight/ceilings’ made of digital screens.
       
     
   Our site is a more humble example of inside - outside relationships, connecting the internal functions of the building with the campus courtyard. As well as its function for pedestrian circulation at two levels, the space is used for display and assessment of the students work.  It is here that my project engages with the site in its specific spatial function, and it is in the spirit of an impromptu street display, such as carpets in a bazaar, that the work from the studio is displayed. The choice of installation method was both determined by the available means and by a desire to engage with the architecture in an ‘off the wall’ expansion.  The immanent narrative of the collaged parts was also an outcome of the improvised rifting of the process.  Formally the imagery can be categorised as a combination of geometric patterning and figurative picturing in near to silhouette painting. Geometric patterning is a visual language that has currency across cultural boundaries. The figurative imagery can draw empathetic recognition of implied narrative at a personal level that can be shared across histories.  Some of the images are opaque while others are transparent, as are some of the surfaces. Some of the fabric is found, some is stretched taught on frames, some is left hanging loose.There is within this materiality and imagery a further articulation of the inside outside dialogue.  The support for the installation is also opportunistically appropriated from the found. Again in response to the circumstances of the project several earlier options were displaced by the red milk crates, borrowed from the kitchen in Building 50. The inclusion of these objects in the composition have a relational readings referring to the spontaneity of the project and literally bringing the studio into the street. There is also a formal reading of colour composition of the red with the blue, engaging with the space. The viewers have responded to this, as well as numerous metaphoric associations.
       
     
SITE  : SCALE
       
     
STUDIO/STREET EXPERIMENTATION
       
     
STUDIO REHERSAL: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
       
     
OUTSIDE IN: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
       
     
EVENT: COLLABORATIVE INSTALLATION
       
     
EVENT: PERFORMATIVE INSTALLATION
       
     
PERFORMATIVE OUTCOME
       
     
OUTSIDE IN IN PLACE
       
     
MATHEMATICS OF THE IDEAL VILLA
       
     
FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE
       
     
WALKING TO SPOON BAY
       
     
THE SIEGE
       
     
THE INNOCENT
       
     
FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE-TRANSPARENT FRAGMENTS
       
     
EVENT: ARTISTS TALK
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION

Curatorial Collective collaboration, installation at First Site as rehearsal for ARTLANDS, Experimenting with taking the studio into the gallery as popup ‘speed’ artist-curator collaboration.

FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION

Curatorial Collective collaboration, installation at First Site as rehearsal for ARTLANDS, Experimenting with taking the studio into the gallery as popup ‘speed’ artist-curator collaboration.

FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION

Curatorial Collective collaboration, installation at First Site as rehearsal for ARTLANDS, Experimenting with taking the studio into the gallery as popup ‘speed’ artist-curator collaboration.

FIRST SITE INSTALLATION
       
     
FIRST SITE INSTALLATION

Curatorial Collective collaboration, installation at First Site as rehearsal for ARTLANDS, Experimenting with taking the studio into the gallery as popup ‘speed’ artist-curator collaboration.

IMG_6016.jpg
       
     
IMG_6015.jpg
       
     
OUTSIND IN
       
     
OUTSIND IN

This year, ARTLAND:2018 will present an exploratory playground of contemporary art by nine multidisciplinary artists. In a time and place where everything is speeding up, screen-culture is entrenched and constantly evolving, ARTLAND:2018 critically responds to our shifting reality.

With touches of humor and the absurd, the artists collectively respond to the theme ‘movement and change, the idea of our digital future is the context of RMIT’S Brunswick campus- melding fact and fiction, and engaging in a performative play with the natural and built environment to explore thresholds and the in-between.

SITE : Entry to the Fashion Building
       
     
SITE : Entry to the Fashion Building
SITE ANALYSIS : ATRIUM/GALLERY/INTERNAL STREET
       
     
SITE ANALYSIS : ATRIUM/GALLERY/INTERNAL STREET

Central circulation spine of the fashion building described in architectural typology as internal street. Double height glazing bonnet with campus courtyard.

SITE FOR ARTWORK
       
     
SITE FOR ARTWORK

Internal wall of circulation spine, under overhead mezzanine walkway.

 The site, the main circulation spine of the fashion building at RMIT Brunswick, in the parlance of architectural typology, can be classified as an internal street. A recently completed example of this is the new Academic Street at RMIT City campus, an ancient example is the Grand Bazaar in Isfahan, Iran, dating from the 11th century. Walter Benjamin,s Arcade Project, much loved by European art theorists, eloquently translates this urban form into the lexicon of the modernist city. Today the ubiquitous shopping malls of the global village, deploy the internal street in prepackaged themes to suit a predetermined program much as movie sets are designed to frame the story. There are now internal ‘tuscan arcades’ as the main circulation spine on the new super cruise ships, complete with vaulted ‘skylight/ceilings’ made of digital screens.
       
     

The site, the main circulation spine of the fashion building at RMIT Brunswick, in the parlance of architectural typology, can be classified as an internal street. A recently completed example of this is the new Academic Street at RMIT City campus, an ancient example is the Grand Bazaar in Isfahan, Iran, dating from the 11th century. Walter Benjamin,s Arcade Project, much loved by European art theorists, eloquently translates this urban form into the lexicon of the modernist city. Today the ubiquitous shopping malls of the global village, deploy the internal street in prepackaged themes to suit a predetermined program much as movie sets are designed to frame the story. There are now internal ‘tuscan arcades’ as the main circulation spine on the new super cruise ships, complete with vaulted ‘skylight/ceilings’ made of digital screens.

   Our site is a more humble example of inside - outside relationships, connecting the internal functions of the building with the campus courtyard. As well as its function for pedestrian circulation at two levels, the space is used for display and assessment of the students work.  It is here that my project engages with the site in its specific spatial function, and it is in the spirit of an impromptu street display, such as carpets in a bazaar, that the work from the studio is displayed. The choice of installation method was both determined by the available means and by a desire to engage with the architecture in an ‘off the wall’ expansion.  The immanent narrative of the collaged parts was also an outcome of the improvised rifting of the process.  Formally the imagery can be categorised as a combination of geometric patterning and figurative picturing in near to silhouette painting. Geometric patterning is a visual language that has currency across cultural boundaries. The figurative imagery can draw empathetic recognition of implied narrative at a personal level that can be shared across histories.  Some of the images are opaque while others are transparent, as are some of the surfaces. Some of the fabric is found, some is stretched taught on frames, some is left hanging loose.There is within this materiality and imagery a further articulation of the inside outside dialogue.  The support for the installation is also opportunistically appropriated from the found. Again in response to the circumstances of the project several earlier options were displaced by the red milk crates, borrowed from the kitchen in Building 50. The inclusion of these objects in the composition have a relational readings referring to the spontaneity of the project and literally bringing the studio into the street. There is also a formal reading of colour composition of the red with the blue, engaging with the space. The viewers have responded to this, as well as numerous metaphoric associations.
       
     

Our site is a more humble example of inside - outside relationships, connecting the internal functions of the building with the campus courtyard. As well as its function for pedestrian circulation at two levels, the space is used for display and assessment of the students work.

It is here that my project engages with the site in its specific spatial function, and it is in the spirit of an impromptu street display, such as carpets in a bazaar, that the work from the studio is displayed. The choice of installation method was both determined by the available means and by a desire to engage with the architecture in an ‘off the wall’ expansion.

The immanent narrative of the collaged parts was also an outcome of the improvised rifting of the process.

Formally the imagery can be categorised as a combination of geometric patterning and figurative picturing in near to silhouette painting. Geometric patterning is a visual language that has currency across cultural boundaries. The figurative imagery can draw empathetic recognition of implied narrative at a personal level that can be shared across histories.

Some of the images are opaque while others are transparent, as are some of the surfaces. Some of the fabric is found, some is stretched taught on frames, some is left hanging loose.There is within this materiality and imagery a further articulation of the inside outside dialogue.

The support for the installation is also opportunistically appropriated from the found. Again in response to the circumstances of the project several earlier options were displaced by the red milk crates, borrowed from the kitchen in Building 50. The inclusion of these objects in the composition have a relational readings referring to the spontaneity of the project and literally bringing the studio into the street. There is also a formal reading of colour composition of the red with the blue, engaging with the space. The viewers have responded to this, as well as numerous metaphoric associations.

SITE  : SCALE
       
     
SITE : SCALE

Scaled modeling of proposal presented for discussion with administration. Technical, and timing issues led to rethinking the installation as a performative installation bringing the studio into the street. The final outcome emerging as another iteration the gleaners harvest.

STUDIO/STREET EXPERIMENTATION
       
     
STUDIO/STREET EXPERIMENTATION

The options to fulfil the proposal, as submitted, were limited by the bureaucratic and administrative process. That is, the period of three months lead time from proposal to install was reduced to one week. The site was not confirmed and material allowances were not available until less than one week before install.

Therefore the process became ,by default, one of repurposing available material FOUND in the studio. Through this method the project became a site responsive example of working within AN ECONOMY OF MEANS, GLEANING from the accumulation of previously harvested materials.

The project became an opportunity to engage the site specific installation as a performative iteration of the THINKING THROUGH MAKING, methodology.

STUDIO REHERSAL: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
       
     
STUDIO REHERSAL: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
OUTSIDE IN: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
       
     
OUTSIDE IN: EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION
EVENT: COLLABORATIVE INSTALLATION
       
     
EVENT: COLLABORATIVE INSTALLATION
EVENT: PERFORMATIVE INSTALLATION
       
     
EVENT: PERFORMATIVE INSTALLATION

The staff on the move again.

PERFORMATIVE OUTCOME
       
     
PERFORMATIVE OUTCOME

The final outcome relying as it did on the spontaneous responsiveness of the process becomes a performative engagement with the space, the process and the people involved in the collaboration. This collaboration included the Curator, other artists with their timely feedback, and the support staff.

This final outcome remains as an as a trace of this process and as an artefact left for contemplation by the passersby, who may glance at it as something incidental in their peripheral vision or may sit on the benches opposite to contemlate further. Much as what happens in the city streets.

OUTSIDE IN IN PLACE
       
     
OUTSIDE IN IN PLACE
MATHEMATICS OF THE IDEAL VILLA
       
     
MATHEMATICS OF THE IDEAL VILLA
FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE
       
     
FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE
WALKING TO SPOON BAY
       
     
WALKING TO SPOON BAY
THE SIEGE
       
     
THE SIEGE

Painting from collaged imagery composing a nonlinear narrative with reference to history painting precedents, video news footage and family snapshots. Brought together in a single surface as a form of shorthand, silhouette. A ‘provisional’ painting, that emphasises its materiality and the hand made while remaining as a sketch or underpainting.

THE INNOCENT
       
     
THE INNOCENT


In this installation the panels have been separated to emphasise the displaced narrative of a frieze frame sequence suggesting a linear reading from left to right that can only be resolved in the viewers mind visually through suspension of the linear reading.

The imagery brings together footage from the Lint Cafe siege in Sydney, an Anzac war memorial in St.Kilda, a mother and child on a beach and a figure from a renaissance painting. Representing a personal response to current events and memory, that resonate across generations. In this installation the provisional shorthand appears as a shadow play on the skin beneath the veil that has fallen away, on this street within.

FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE-TRANSPARENT FRAGMENTS
       
     
FOOTPRINTS OF THE TEMPLE-TRANSPARENT FRAGMENTS
EVENT: ARTISTS TALK
       
     
EVENT: ARTISTS TALK